Skip to main content

Saving & Spending Wisely on Your Money Matters...with Ripon Ray


One-in-three adults in England and Northern Ireland cannot work out the correct change from a shopping trip, according to new research from UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and University of Cambridge. With Such a shocking data financial education plays a huge part in overcoming such a challenge especially when you are on low income. Tanzila Zaman, Money Mentor at Money A+E, elegantly demonstrates where listeners can save money just being clever with your shopping habits. She highlights three things:

1. Having a goal for saving is essential e.g. holiday, paying for your first mortgage or honing your existing skills for your career progression

2. Planning your budget to make sure essential expenses are already have been secured.


3. Looking around for cheaper deals instead of just going with your instinct as you see things

Tanzila does not shy away from talking about what’s in your wardrobe. There are clothes and other objects that you can sell to top up your income! Selling them will declutter your personal space and your mind!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A debt free path for a mental health sufferer

It’s a well-known fact that individuals who suffer from a hampered mental capacity - be it mental health or learning difficulties - are most likely to be vulnerable in our communities. They are also more likely to be victims of miss-sold products and services by companies, even though organisations that are providing financial products and services have a duty under the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to take extra care towards these individuals. This is what the FCA has to say about vulnerable customers: ‘  The vulnerability of the customer, in particular where the firm understands the customer has some form of mental capacity limitation or reasonably suspects this to be so because the customer displays indications of some form of mental capacity limitation  (see  ■  CONC 2.10) But due to a culture of intensive selling to consumers, generated by employers placing and enforcing - often difficult and unrealistic - performance goals which are attached to tempting

(Part I) My presentation on universal credit and debt on Carers Day with Hackney Carers Centre (slides of the presentation included) brought to you by Hackney Council and Carers are the Bedrock

“Thank you so much for coming along, the ‘money’ workshops were by far the most popular, that was you and ‘Direct Payments”        Lisa Taylor Carers Coordination Service Manager           Hackney Carers Centre

Is Council Tax really Poll Tax? Where is the momentum for a new campaign?

‘I have not been able to pay my council tax for last four years. Bailiffs have lied to me to get money from me. I still can’t afford it!’  says Joanna Robinson on Money Matters show on East London Radio in March 2018.   During the period 2016-17, bailiffs were used by councils on nearly 1.5 million occasions in order to attempt recovery of council tax arrears. As in Joanna's case, residents were summoned to court for being too poor to pay - accruing court costs, subjected to the ignominy and anxiety having to face enforcement agents, and already too poor to pay, further indebtedness.   As I hear the horror stories of bailiff’s knocking on debtors’ doors under the new Council Tax Reduction Scheme (CTRS), I am beginning to worry that the Scheme is really just a Poll Tax rehash. I was too young to remember what the Poll Tax was when it was first introduced in the late 1980s. My parents never spoke about it. In my work I started to notice from 2013 onwards that mo